Public Health Seminar Series:

Racial and gender differences in the association between food insecurity and type 2 diabetes by Sabrina Strings, Ph.D.

NOTICE: Note Special Location

Monday, February 23, 2015 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM 6011 Donal Bren Hall OCW Video Archive
Seminar Abstract

Background: African Americans and Latinos have the highest rates of food insecurity (FI) in the United States. However, little is known about how the relationship between FI and T2D may vary by gender and race/ethnicity. In this study, we examined whether the relationship between FI and T2D varied by race/ethnicity and gender. Methods: We analyzed data from low-income (<=200% federal poverty level) adults aged 18 or older participating in the 2009 and 2011 waves of the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) (N=27,798). Results: In white women, we observed a positive association between severe FI and T2D (adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) = 1.6 (1.1, 2.5)), but no association between mild FI and T2D. In white men, we observed a positive association between mild FI and T2D (OR (CI) = 1.9 (1.2, 3.2)) but no association with severe FI. In Latinas, we observed a positive association between both mild FI (OR (CI) = 1.7 (1.3, 2.2)) and severe FI (OR (CI) = 1.8 (1.2, 2.6)) and T2D. In Latinos, we observed a positive association between severe FI and T2D (OR (CI) = 1.7 (1.1, 2.7)), but no association between mild FI and T2D. We did not observe any associations between FI and T2D in African-American women and men in this sample. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that food insecurity is associated with type 2 diabetes among Latinos and Whites, but not among African Americans. For African Americans, limited geographic access to food resulting from residential segregation, rather than food insecurity, may be a more significant driver of increased risk of diabetes. Future research should examine the extent to which local food availability may modify the effect of food insecurity on T2D across racially diverse populations.

Speaker Biography - Sabrina Strings, Ph.D.

Sabrina Strings, Ph.D.
Sabrina Strings, Ph.D. School of Public Health and Department of Sociology, UC Berkeley
Sabrina Strings has a Ph.D. in Sociology from UC San Diego. Her work centers on studies of race, gender, embodiment, and the social determinants of illness. Her articles and essays are featured in venues including Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (forthcoming), Feminist Media Studies, and The Feminist Wire. Sabrina is the director of the Richmond Yoga Project, a grant-funded stress reduction program for African Americans living with chronic illness in Richmond (to start 2015). She is also the co-founding editor of the journal Race and Yoga, published by the University of California's eScholarship. Sabrina is currently a UC Berkeley Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow with a joint appointment in the School of Public Health and Department of Sociology.

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