Public Health Seminar Series:

Health Disparities in a Racially Ambiguous Population: Challenging the Narrative on Diversity, Race and Health
by David Hayes-Bautista, Ph.D.

Mon, April 30, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm OCW Video Archive
Seminar Abstract

NIH requires that research results be reported by the five official race/ethnic categories: white, black, Asian/pacific islander, american Indian and Hispanic. However, in California, babies of 2013, 53% were racially ambiguous: the mothers and fathers were of different race/ethnic origins. This presentation will offer current research on race/ethnic categories and racially ambiguous babies.

Speaker Biography - David Hayes-Bautista, Ph.D.

David Hayes-Bautista, Ph.D.
David Hayes-Bautista, Ph.D. Professor of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health; Director, Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture, UCLA
David E. Hayes-Bautista, Ph.D. is currently Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He graduated from U.C. Berkeley, and completed his doctoral work in Basic Sciences at the University of California Medical Center, San Francisco. Dr. Hayes-Bautista served on the faculty at the School of Public Health at U.C. Berkeley until 1987, when he took his current position at UCLA. Dr. Hayes-Bautista’s research appears in a variety of medical journals including Family Medicine, the American Journal of Public Health, Family Practice, Academic Medicine and Salud Pública de México. Some of his published books include The Burden of Support: Young Latinos in an Aging Society (Stanford University Press, 1988), El Cinco de Mayo: An American Tradition (University of California Press, 2012) and La Nueva California: Latinos from Pioneers to Post Millennials (University of California Press, 2017.) Dr. Hayes-Bautista writes columns for the Los Angeles Times and La Opinion, and is often asked to provide opinions on radio and television in both Spanish and English. For the past five years, he has been chosen one of the 101 Top Leaders of the Latino Community in the U.S. by Latino Leaders Magazine. In 2012, he received the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Herbert W. Nickens Award for his lifelong concerns about the educational, societal, and health care needs of underrepresented groups, and in 2016 the Ohtli Award from the Mexican Government.

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